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MAKING THE MODERN WORLD
Stories about the lives we've made

module:Textiles: From domestic to factory production

The Industrial Revolution and the textiles industries

page:Evidence of buildings: Piece Hall, Halifax

A surviving cloth hall

Markets could sometimes be large-scale affairs, like these surviving buildings of Piece Hall, Halifax, successor to the market that domestic producers such as Cornelius Ashworth would have used.

This first image of Piece Hall shows that the market was separated from the rest of the town.


Piece Hall, Halifax. The market was separated from the rest of the town. picture zoom © J.N.Hare, c.2002


Weavers came from the villages around to sell to the local cloth merchants. These merchants would then trade with richer merchants from London and other trading centres, who came to buy cloth in bulk.

All the images suggest that the architecture of the hall was designed to impress. Here was a building that was designed to show off the wealth of the Halifax traders who financed it, while also separating the market from the town outside.


Piece Hall, Halifax, built in 1775. picture zoom © J.N.Hare, c.2002


Like other important buildings of the same period it was designed in the classical style (which meant that it referred or looked back to the world of ancient Rome).


Impressive classical architecture at Piece Hall, Halifax. picture zoom © J.N.Hare, c.2002


The central area was used for buying and selling while cloth traders had offices and shops in the buildings around it.

Resource Descriptions

Piece Hall, Halifax. The market was separated from the rest of the town.
Piece Hall, Halifax, built in 1775.
Impressive classical architecture at Piece Hall, Halifax.
Object
Scene  Rich Media
Scene  Rich Media
Learning Module
Learning Module